Agenda

SAVE-THE-DATE for the 43rd Annual Symposium on the American Indian
April 14-18, 2015






Information below is for the 42nd Annual Symposium on the American Indian
Thriving Nations - Resilient Peoples



April 7-12, 2014

Symposium Program (3.9 mb)

Pre-Symposium Events
Monday, April 7
Tuesday, April 8
Wednesday, April 9
Thursday, April 10
Friday, April 11
NSU Powwow

 



Pre-Symposium Events



5K Resilience Run and 1K Fun Run
Saturday, April 5
6:30a Registration
8:00a 5K Run; 8:05 1K Fun Run
Centennial Plaza

Race-day registration begins at 6:30 a.m. at Centennial Plaza.
Pre-registration is available online through Thursday, April 3 at I40 Racing Service at www.nsuresiliencerun.eventbrite.com. Pre-registration forms are also available at the Center for Tribal Studies through Thursday, April 3. Email wicklift@nsuok.edu.

American Indian Symposium Film Series: Navajo Code Talkers
Monday, April 7 6:30–8:30p

Webb Auditorium
Dr. Laura Tohe (Navajo), author, poet, and professor of English, Arizona State University, Tempe The author of Code Talker Stories, Dr. Tohe will introduce the documentary Navajo Code Talkers with a discussion of her work and the personal accounts of Navajo veterans whose unique military service remained classified for many years. During World Wars I and II, American Indian servicemen, using tribal languages, developed military codes for communication that could not be broken by the enemy. At least nine tribal languages were employed, but the Navajo group was the largest. Her perspective reflects the experience of a whole generation of family members who, for many years, remained unaware of the “code talkers”,including Dr. Tohe herself, whose own father served in this elite group. A question and answer period will follow. Dr. Tohe will be joined by NSU librarian Delores Sumner, whose father and uncles also served in World War II as Comanche code talkers.

American Indian Symposium Film Series
Title TBA
Tuesday, April 8 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Webb Auditorium

Stephen Paul Judd (Kiowa/Choctaw), painter, independent film maker, director, and writer from Moore, OK.

American Indian Symposium Film Series
Musical Performance: Becky Hobbs
Film Feature: Reel Injun
Wednesday, April 9 7:00 – 7:30p
Webb Auditorium

Opening Feature: Live musical performance by Becky Hobbs
Becky Hobbs
(Cherokee), singer-songwriter in the Southern Rock style, with over 20 chart singles/albums. An internationally- known performer, Hobbs co-wrote with Nick Sweetand composed the score for the musical “Nanyehi – Beloved Woman of the Cherokee,” based on the life of her direct ancestor, Nancy Ward. The original play had its Oklahoma premiere at the NSU Performing Arts Center during the 2013 Cherokee National Holiday and will return for the Holiday this year.

Sponsor: Cherokee Nation Businesses and Cherokee Cultural Tourism

Wednesday, April 9 7:00 – 7:30p
Webb Auditorium
Film Series Feature: Reel Injun

Reel Injun, an independent film from the Emmy Award winning PBS series Independent Lens, was directed by Cree filmmaker Neil Diamond, Catherine Bainbridge, and Jeremiah Hays. The 2009 Canadian documentary explores stereotypes
about Native people in Hollywood movies.

Sponsors: Center for Tribal Studies and the NSU Indigenous Scholar Development Center (ISDC)


^^TOP



Monday, April 7


 

American Indian Symposium Film Series: Navajo Code Talkers
Monday, April 7 6:30–8:30p

Webb Auditorium
Dr. Laura Tohe (Navajo), author, poet, and professor of English, Arizona State University, Tempe The author of Code Talker Stories, Dr. Tohe will introduce the documentary Navajo Code Talkers with a discussion of her work and the personal accounts of Navajo veterans whose unique military service remained classified for many years. During World Wars I and II, American Indian servicemen, using tribal languages, developed military codes for communication that could not be broken by the enemy. At least nine tribal languages were employed, but the Navajo group was the largest. Her perspective reflects the experience of a whole generation of family members who, for many years, remained unaware of the “code talkers”,including Dr. Tohe herself, whose own father served in this elite group. A question and answer period will follow. Dr. Tohe will be joined by NSU librarian Delores Sumner, whose father and uncles also served in World War II as Comanche code talkers.

^^TOP



Tuesday, April 8


American Indian Symposium Film Series
Title TBA
Tuesday, April 8 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Webb Auditorium

Stephen Paul Judd (Kiowa/Choctaw), painter, independent film maker, director, and writer from Moore, OK.

^^TOP  



Wednesday, April 10


Vendors
Traditional Arts Vendors

Daily 9-4 W-F
Friday evening 6-10
Saturday 1-11 p.m.

Institutional Vendors
Daily 9-4 W-F
Friday evening 6-10
Saturday 1-11 p.m.

NASA Opening Ceremony
9:30 am UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor
Dr. Phyllis Fife - Official Opening & Introductions
Tennessee Loy, President, Native American Student Association (NASA), presiding
Presentation of Colors - United Keetoowah Band Honor Guard
Grand Entry & Flag Song - Kelly Anquoe (Kiowa/Cherokee)
President Steve Turner, NSU welcome
Principal Chief Bill John Baker, Cherokee Nation welcome
Principal Chief George Wickliffe, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians welcome
Song performance - Cherokee Nation Immersion School 2nd Grade; Meda Nix, teacher

Keynote Address: American Indian Resilience and Rebuilding Nations in Indian Country
10:00a UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor
Donald L. Fixico, Ph.D.,
(Shawnee, Sac & Fox, Muscogee [Creek], Seminole), Distinguished Foundation Professor of History, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ

Since the lowest point of their total population in the late 1800s when people believed Indians would vanish as a race, American Indians began to rebuild their nations in the 20th century. With tremendous resilience and acquiring new cultural tools, Indian communities survived the early decades of the 20th century and started to rebuild after World War II to the present. By seeing the glass half-full, Indian nations have made impressive progress throughout a modern Indian Country.

Booksigning – Dr. Donald Fixico
10:50a UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Musical entertainment will be provided during the book signing.

Honoring Our People’s Existence (H.O.P.E.) – Traditional Dance
10:50a UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Sequoyah High School H.O.P.E. Club; Tonya Soap, sponsor
H.O.P.E. is a club at Sequoyah Schools that exposes students to various Native American cultures. The club recently participated in the grand entry at the Denver March Powwow in Colorado. They raised money for Special Olympics at the Tahlequah Polar Plunge and collected donations for the Angel Tree.

Friend H.O.P.E. on Facebook at Sequoyah Schools HOPE Club.

11:30a Lunch on your own


Keynote Address: Violence Against Native Women and the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)
1:00p UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor
Sarah Deer, J.D.
, (Muscogee [Creek]), Associate Professor, William Mitchell College of Law, St. Paul, MN
Criminal jurisdiction in Indian Country is a complex area of federal Indian law. The Violence Against Women Act of 2013 (VAWA), signed into law on March 7, will change the scope of protection for American Indian victims of domestic violence, closing significant gaps in the justice system and expanding the authority of tribal courts to prosecute domestic violence crimes committed against Native American women. This is
an important step for tribal governments, increasing their authority to protect their citizens and a milestone toward resilience and healing for domestic violence victims.

Panel Discussion: The Future of American Indian and Indigenous Studies
2:00p UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Moderator: Donald L. Fixico, Ph.D., (Shawnee, Sac & Fox, Muscogee [Creek], Seminole), Distinguished Foundation Professor of History, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.
Panelists: Dr. Amanda Cobb-Greetham, English Department, Oklahoma State University; Dr. Ben Kracht,NSU Cherokee & Indigenous Studies; Dr. Gus Palmer, Native American Studies, University of Oklahoma; Dr. Sean Teuton, Department of English, University of Arkansas

Hearing Tests: Walk-in Screening
2:00 pm - 5:00 pm UC 223-224, 2nd Floor

Native Americans are at high risk for hearing loss causes by genetics, noise, medications, and ageing. As a service of the NSU Speech and Hearing Cliniic, symposium guests are invited to come in for a hearing test. Just walk in and sign up.

Special Event: Miss NASA 2013-2014 Reception
4:00p University Center Balcony, 2nd Floor

Join Miss NASA 2013-2014 Elizabeth Lee (Cherokee) and members of the Native American Student Association for a reception in honor of the newly crowned Miss NASA 2014-2015. Everyone is welcome.

American Indian Symposium Film Series
Musical Performance: Becky Hobbs
Film Feature: Reel Injun
Wednesday, April 9 7:00 – 7:30p
Webb Auditorium

Opening Feature: Live musical performance by Becky Hobbs
Becky Hobbs
(Cherokee), singer-songwriter in the Southern Rock style, with over 20 chart singles/albums. An internationally- known performer, Hobbs co-wrote with Nick Sweetand composed the score for the musical “Nanyehi – Beloved Woman of the Cherokee,” based on the life of her direct ancestor, Nancy Ward. The original play had its Oklahoma premiere at the NSU Performing Arts Center during the 2013 Cherokee National Holiday and will return for the Holiday this year.

Sponsor: Cherokee Nation Businesses and Cherokee Cultural Tourism

Wednesday, April 9 7:00 – 7:30p
Webb Auditorium
Film Series Feature: Reel Injun

Reel Injun, an independent film from the Emmy Award winning PBS series Independent Lens, was directed by Cree filmmaker Neil Diamond, Catherine Bainbridge, and Jeremiah Hays. The 2009 Canadian documentary explores stereotypes
about Native people in Hollywood movies.

Sponsors: Center for Tribal Studies and the NSU Indigenous Scholar Development Center (ISDC)

^^TOP



Thursday, April 11


Vendors
Traditional Arts Vendors

Daily 9-4 W-F
Friday evening 6-10
Saturday 1-11 p.m.

Institutional Vendors
Daily 9-4 W-F
Friday evening 6-10
Saturday 1-11 p.m.

General Assembly
10:00a UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor
Cherokee Promise Scholars, presiding
Welcome from Native programs and organizations
Alpha Pi Omega
American Indian Business Leaders
American Indian Science and Engineering Society
Center for Tribal Studies
Cherokee Promise Scholars
Gates Millennium Scholars
Indigenous Scholar Development Center
Native American Student Association
Phi Sigma Nu

Song Performance - Cherokee Children’s Community Choir
directed by Tricia Nichols

Keynote Address: Languages on the Brink

10:30a UC Ballroom, 2nd Floor
Dr. Leanne Hinton, emerita professor of linguistics at the University of California at Berkeley; Distinguished scholar in American Indian languages, sociolinguistics, and language revitalization Ninety percent of the world’s languages are spoken by only 10 percent of the people, and the percentage is going down fast. In North America, only about a dozen languages – out of over 175 – are still being learned by children at home. Most languages are spoken only by elders today, which means that if we stay on the same path, the languages and the knowledge systems and cultural practices that go with them, will all be gone sometime during this century. Yet at the same time that the speakers of these languages are starting to leave us, grassroots efforts are springing up to combat this loss. We see these efforts here in Oklahoma and all over the world. Universities and academic disciplines are joining with indigenous communities to implement plans of action, and even the language policies of our country and other countries are changing toward support of the indigenous tongues. We will look at some of the community based programs that are taking place in Oklahoma and elsewhere in the United States to try to turn language loss around, and discuss what is being gained in the process.

Dr. Hinton will also lead the inaugural Revitalizing Endangered Languages Conference on Saturday.

Booksigning - Dr. Leanne Hinton
11:15a UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor


Honoring Our People’s Existence (H.O.P.E.) – Traditional Dance
11:15a UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Sequoyah High School H.O.P.E. Club; Tonya Soap, sponsor H.O.P.E. is a club at Sequoyah Schools that exposes students to various Native American cultures. The club recently participated in the grand entry at the Denver March Powwow in Colorado. They raised money for Special Olympics at the Tahlequah Polar Plunge and collected donations for the Angel Tree.

Friend H.O.P.E. on Facebook at Sequoyah Schools HOPE Club.

11:45a Lunch on your own

Resilient Warriors: Researching the Indian Code Talkers
1:00p - 1:50p UC Room 222, 2nd Floor
Steve Beleu
, U.S. Government Information Division, Oklahoma Department of Libraries, and Samantha Clifford, Government Documents Librarian, John Vaughn Library, NSU
Learn how to use the Native Words, Native Warriors website from the National Museum of the American Indian that has been on display in the NSU Library from January 25 – April 7. We will also look at additional online resources about Code Talkers, including the Comanche and Choctaw Code Talkers websites, the Navajo Code Talker’s Dictionary, and the National Archives as well as the Oklahoma History Center websites.

Sponsor: NSU John Vaughn Library and Oklahoma Department of Libraries

Concurrent Session B
1:00p - 1:50p UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Gene Norris, Geneaologist, Cherokee Heritage Center
Sponsor: Cherokee Historical Society

Native Language Forum: Cherokee Language Student Forum
1:00-2:50p Redbud Room, 3rd Floor
Coordinator: Wyman Kirk
(Cherokee), Instructor, NSU Cherokee Language Education

Sponsor: NSU Department of Cherokee and Indigenous Studies, Cherokee Language Education Program

Warrior’s Wife: A Narrative of Resiliency
2:00p UC Rozell Ballroom B, 2nd Floor

Dr. Stacy Pratt (Muscogee [Creek]), writer, musician, performer; Assistant Professor of English, State University of New York, Jefferson Community College, Watertown
Much is made of the resiliency of military families, but what does “resiliency” really look like, and how is it developed? Through prose, poetry, and song, this presentation traces the personal experience of one military spouse through deployments, homecomings, and all points in between to reflect the role cultural values play in developing personal and familial resiliency.

Concurrent Session B
2:00p UC Room 223, 2nd Floor

TBA

Native Language Forum: Mvskoke Language
3:00p UC Rozell Ballroom B, 2nd Floor

Mvhayv Norma Marshall (Muscogee [Creek]), College of the Muscogee Nation

Sponsor: College of the Muscogee Nation

Indigenous Languages Documentation and Revitalization Seminar
6:00p – 8:00p UC Morgan Rm, 3rd Floor

Part 1: Issues of Language Endangerment
Dr. Colleen Fitzgerald
, professor of linguistics & director of the Native American Languages Lab, University of Texas – Arlington. Will lead the Indigenous Languages Documentation and Revitalization Seminar with seminar team: Durbin Feeling (Cherokee), Joshua Hinson (Chickasaw), Dr. Mary Linn (OU Sam Noble Museum), and Dr. Brad Montgomery Anderson (Cherokee Electronic Dictionary & NSU linguistics).

Co-hosted by: Oklahoma Native Language Association (ONLA) and the NSU Center for Tribal Studies
Sponsor: Oklahoma Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities

Cultural Activity: Tahlequah Marbles Society
7:00 – 9:00 Cherokee Heritage Center Marble Field

The Cherokee game of Indian Marbles has a long history in Delaware, Cherokee, Adair, Sequoyah, and surrounding counties in Oklahoma. Legends tell of a long history even before the Removal to Indian Territory when marbles were handmade from stone. Today pool or billiard balls are used. The playing field has a pattern of five holes in the ground. Players throw or roll the marbles to the holes from a standing position with an underhand throw. Players may also hit opponent marbles away to help their team move through the course. Good players are highly skilled in game strategy, physical accuracy, and team competition.

^^TOP



Friday, April 11


Indigenous Languages Documentation and Revitalization Seminar
8:30a – 5:00p UC Morgan Room, 3rd Floor

Part 2: Talking Dictionaries for Indigenous Languages
Dr. Colleen Fitzgerald, professor of linguistics & director of the Native American Languages Lab, University of Texas – Arlington. Will lead the Indigenous Languages Documentation and Revitalization Seminar with seminar team: Durbin Feeling (Cherokee), Joshua Hinson (Chickasaw), Dr. Mary Linn (OU Sam Noble Museum), and Dr. Brad Montgomery Anderson (Cherokee Electronic Dictionary & NSU linguistics).

Co-hosted by: Oklahoma Native Language Association (ONLA) and the NSU Center for Tribal Studies
Sponsor: Oklahoma Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities

Drama, Art Shows, Ancient Village and look into the future.
Gina Burnett – Basket making, Nathan Wolf – Stickball Sticks and Charlotte Wolf – Stick Balls. Watch these Cherokee artisans create traditional art forms.

Sponsor: Cherokee Heritage Center

General Assembly: AISES Day
10:00a UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor

American Indian Science and Engineering Society
Deanna Grass, President, presiding

Keynote Address: Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community
10:15a UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor
Dr. Brenda Child (Ojibwe), Associate Professor of American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota. Her newest book is Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community (Viking/Penguin, 2012)

Sponsor: Visiting Indigenous Scholar

Booksigning: Dr. Brenda Childs
11:00a UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Coordinator: RiverHawk Shoppe, Barnes and Noble Campus Bookstore
Sponsor: ISDC Visiting Indigenous Scholar Program

AISES Luncheon: Tribal Governance and Community Sustainability
11:30a UC Rozell Ballroom A , 2nd Floor

Stacy Leeds, J.D., (Cherokee), Dean, University of Arkansas School of Law, Fayetteville
The presentation will address the role of tribal governance in creating and maintaining sustainable tribal communities, particularly in the areas of land use, food and agricultural policy, and economic development. In the last decade, this number of natives in agriculture has skyrocketed, yet few tribes have actively prioritized and supported the expansion of a growing economic sector around American Indian-controlled farms and ranches and food-related businesses. As part of the discussion, tribal property law, land use planning and regulatory powers will be explored, including the history of external challenges from state and federal entities.

Sponsors: OK EPSCoR and NSU American Indian Studies

Arts of Indigenous Cultures - Panel Discussion: Southeastern
Indian Art: Building Community and Raising Awareness

1:00 – 2:30p UC Rozell Ballroom B, 2nd Floor

Moderator: Roy Boney (Cherokee), artist, writer, language technologist, and manager of the Cherokee Nation Language Program.
Panelists: America Meridith (Cherokee), painter, multimedia artist; Troy Jackson (Cherokee), ceramicist; Bobby Martin (Muscogee [Creek]), painter, printmaker, educator, curator; Tony Tiger (Sac & Fox, Seminole, and Muscogee [Creek]), painter, mixed-media, printmaking artist.

The Southeastern tribes have a distinct visual culture that is often overshadowed by what the popular imagination thinks of as “native art.” The panel will discuss the state of southeastern art and its significance in the art world. To learn more about the Southeastern Art Association go to: www.seiaa.org. For individual artists go to: www.troyjacksonartist.com; www.royboney.com; www.bobbycmartin.com

American Indian Studies: Field Methods in Ethnology Student Presentation
1:00-2:30p UC Redbud Room, 3rd Floor

Dr. Benjamin Kracht, Professor of Anthropology; coordinator,
American Indian Studies; chair, Department of Cherokee and Indigenous Studies, NSU

Closing Cultural Activity: Traditional Stickball Games
3:00p Beta Field
Observe the game traditionally referred to as “little brother of war” among Southeastern tribes. The game of lacrosse is believed to have evolved from this ancient sport. Audience participation is welcome. Signed waivers of liability are required.

NSU Powwow
6:00 – 10:00 p.m. NSU Event Center


HEAD STAFF
MC - Kelly Anquoe (Kiowa/Cherokee)
Head Lady Dancer – Elsie Whitehorn (Otoe-Missouria/Iowa/Navajo)
Head Man Dancer – Keenan Springer (Comanche/Kiowa/Sac & Fox)
Head Gourd Dancer – James Williams (Kiowa/Apache/Tonkawa)
Head Singer – Aaron Adson (Pawnee/Dine/Comanche)
Color Guard – United Keetoowah Band Honor Guard
Arena Director – Chuck Bread (Kiowa)

Sponsor: Oklahoma Arts Council, Muscogee Creek Casino

SCHEDULE

6 pm - Gourd Dancing
8 pm - Grand Entry
Contests (point system) 

 

^^TOP



NSU POWWOW


Welcome to the new NSU Event Center! Gourd dancing, grand entry, intertribal dancing, and contest dancing. Free and open to the public. Vendors welcome.

Friday, April 11
6:00 – 10:00 p.m. NSU Event Center


HEAD STAFF
MC - Kelly Anquoe (Kiowa/Cherokee)
Head Lady Dancer – Elsie Whitehorn (Otoe-Missouria/Iowa/Navajo)
Head Man Dancer – Keenan Springer (Comanche/Kiowa/Sac & Fox)
Head Gourd Dancer – James Williams (Kiowa/Apache/Tonkawa)
Head Singer – Aaron Adson (Pawnee/Dine/Comanche)
Color Guard – United Keetoowah Band Honor Guard
Arena Director – Chuck Bread (Kiowa)

Sponsor: Oklahoma Arts Council, Muscogee Creek Casino

SCHEDULE

6 pm - Gourd Dancing
8 pm - Grand Entry
Contests (point system)

Saturday, April 12
6:00 – 10:00 p.m. UC Rozell Ballroom, 2nd Floor


HEAD STAFF

MC - Kelly Anquoe (Kiowa/Cherokee)
Head Lady Dancer – Elsie Whitehorn (Otoe-Missouria/Iowa/Navajo)
Head Man Dancer – Keenan Springer (Comanche/Kiowa/Sac & Fox)
Head Gourd Dancer – James Williams (Kiowa/Apache/Tonkawa)
Head Singer – Aaron Adson (Pawnee/Dine/Comanche)
Color Guard – United Keetoowah Band Honor Guard
Arena Director – Chuck Bread (Kiowa)

Sponsor: Oklahoma Arts Council, Muscogee Creek Casino

SCHEDULE
2 pm - Gourd Dancing
5 pm - Supper
7 pm - Grand Entry
Contests (point system)

^^TOP